Direct Access Immigration Barristers

If you wish to book a Direct Access Barrister who covers an area of law that you are looking for a Solicitor for, get in touch as soon as possible. Direct Access Barristers who are authorised to conduct litigation can provide most of the legal services that Solicitors can. It may often be more cost effective to instruct a Barrister directly than to instruct a Solicitor. You can call 0207 867 3744 to get in touch with a Direct Access Barrister who is an alternative to a Solicitor. When you call provide brief details of the assistance you will require, you will then be provided with a quote to agree, a client care letter will be sent to you inclusive of terms and conditions. You will then provide all papers relating to your matter, make payment and the work will be completed. Direct Access Barristers also refer matters to Solicitors.

Direct Access Immigration Barristers

In most countries, barristers operate as sole practitioners and are prohibited from forming partnerships or from working as a barrister as part of a corporation. (In 2009, the Clementi Report recommended the abolition of this restriction in England and Wales.[3]) However, barristers normally band together into “chambers” to share clerks (administrators) and operating expenses. Some chambers grow to be large and sophisticated and have a distinctly corporate feel. In some jurisdictions, they may be employed by firms of solicitors, banks, or corporations as in-house legal advisers.

In contrast, solicitors and attorneys work directly with the clients and are responsible for engaging a barrister with the appropriate expertise for the case. Barristers generally have little or no direct contact with their ‘lay clients’, particularly without the presence or involvement of the solicitor. All correspondence, inquiries, invoices, and so on, will be addressed to the solicitor, who is primarily responsible for the barrister’s fees.

In court, barristers are often visibly distinguished from solicitors by their apparel. For example, in Ireland, England, and Wales, a barrister usually wears a horsehair wig, stiff collar, bands, and a gown. Since January 2008, solicitor advocates have also been entitled to wear wigs, but wear different gowns.[4]

The term economic migrant refers to someone who has travelled from one region to another region for the purposes of seeking employment and an improvement in quality of life and access to resources. An economic migrant is distinct from someone who is a refugee fleeing persecution.

Many countries have immigration and visa restrictions that prohibit a person entering the country for the purposes of gaining work without a valid work visa. As a violation of a State’s immigration laws a person who is declared to be an economic migrant can be refused entry into a country.

The World Bank estimates that remittances totaled $420 billion in 2009, of which $317 billion went to developing countries.[53]