Direct Access Criminal Barristers

If you wish to book a Direct Access Barrister who covers an area of law that you are looking for a Solicitor for, get in touch as soon as possible. Direct Access Barristers who are authorised to conduct litigation can provide most of the legal services that Solicitors can. It may often be more cost effective to instruct a Barrister directly than to instruct a Solicitor. You can call 0207 867 3744 to get in touch with a Direct Access Barrister who is an alternative to a Solicitor. When you call provide brief details of the assistance you will require, you will then be provided with a quote to agree, a client care letter will be sent to you inclusive of terms and conditions. You will then provide all papers relating to your matter, make payment and the work will be completed. Direct Access Barristers also refer matters to Solicitors.

Direct Access Criminal Barristers

Many criminal codes protect the physical integrity of the body. The crime of battery is traditionally understood as an unlawful touching, although this does not include everyday knocks and jolts to which people silently consent as the result of presence in a crowd. Creating a fear of imminent battery is an assault, and also may give rise to criminal liability. Non-consensual intercourse, or rape, is a particularly egregious form of battery.

Property offenses[edit]

Main articles: Criminal damageCriminal trespassTheftRobberyExtortionDacoityBurglary, and Fraud

Property often is protected by the criminal law. Trespassing is unlawful entry onto the real property of another. Many criminal codes provide penalties for conversionembezzlementtheft, all of which involve deprivations of the value of the property. Robbery is a theft by force. Fraud in the UK is a breach of the Fraud Act 2006 by false representation, by failure to disclose information or by abuse of position.

Certain barristers in England and Wales are now instructed directly by members of the public.[17] Members of the public may engage the services of the barrister directly within the framework of the Public Access Scheme; a solicitor is not involved at any stage. Barristers undertaking public access work can provide legal advice and representation in court in almost all areas of law (see the Public Access Information on the Bar Council website)[18] and are entitled to represent clients in any court or tribunal in England and Wales. Once instructions from a client are accepted, it is the barrister (rather than the solicitor) who advises and guides the client through the relevant legal procedure or litigation.

Before a barrister can undertake Public Access work, they must have completed a special course. At present, about one in 20 barristers has so qualified. There is also a separate scheme called ‘Licensed Access’, available to certain nominated classes of professional client; it is not open to the general public. Public access work is experiencing a huge surge at the bar, with barristers taking advantage of the new opportunity for the bar to make profit in the face of legal aid cuts elsewhere in the profession.

The ability of barristers to accept such instructions is a recent development; it results from a change in the rules set down by the General Council of the Bar in July 2004. The Public Access Scheme has been introduced as part of the drive to open up the legal system to the public and to make it easier and cheaper to obtain access to legal advice. It further reduces the distinction between solicitors and barristers. The distinction remains however because there are certain aspects of a solicitor’s role that a barrister is not able to undertake.