Criminal Barristers London

If you wish to book a Direct Access Barrister who covers an area of law that you are looking for a Solicitor for, get in touch as soon as possible. Direct Access Barristers who are authorised to conduct litigation can provide most of the legal services that Solicitors can. It may often be more cost effective to instruct a Barrister directly than to instruct a Solicitor. You can call 0207 867 3744 to get in touch with a Direct Access Barrister who is an alternative to a Solicitor. When you call provide brief details of the assistance you will require, you will then be provided with a quote to agree, a client care letter will be sent to you inclusive of terms and conditions. You will then provide all papers relating to your matter, make payment and the work will be completed. Direct Access Barristers also refer matters to Solicitors.

Criminal Barristers London

The first signs of the modern distinction between crimes and civil matters emerged during the Norman Invasion of England.[6] The special notion of criminal penalty, at least concerning Europe, arose in Spanish Late Scholasticism (see Alfonso de Castro), when the theological notion of God’s penalty (poena aeterna) that was inflicted solely for a guilty mind, became transfused into canon law first and, finally, to secular criminal law.[7] The development of the state dispensing justice in a court clearly emerged in the eighteenth century when European countries began maintaining police services. From this point, criminal law formalized the mechanisms for enforcement, which allowed for its development as a discernible entity.

Objectives of criminal law[edit]

Criminal law is distinctive for the uniquely serious, potential consequences or sanctions for failure to abide by its rules.[8] Every crime is composed of criminal elementsCapital punishment may be imposed in some jurisdictions for the most serious crimes. Physical or corporal punishment may be imposed such as whipping or caning, although these punishments are prohibited in much of the world. Individuals may be incarcerated in prison or jail in a variety of conditions depending on the jurisdiction. Confinement may be solitary. Length of incarceration may vary from a day to life. Government supervision may be imposed, including house arrest, and convicts may be required to conform to particularized guidelines as part of a parole or probation regimen. Fines also may be imposed, seizing money or property from a person convicted of a crime.

Five objectives are widely accepted for enforcement of the criminal law by punishmentsretributiondeterrenceincapacitationrehabilitation and restoration. Jurisdictions differ on the value to be placed on each.

  • Retribution – Criminals ought to Be Punished in some way. This is the most widely seen goal. Criminals have taken improper advantage, or inflicted unfair detriment, upon others and consequently, the criminal law will put criminals at some unpleasant disadvantage to “balance the scales.” People submit to the law to receive the right not to be murdered and if people contravene these laws, they surrender the rights granted to them by the law. Thus, one who murders may be executed himself. A related theory includes the idea of “righting the balance.”

Justification for a split profession[edit]

Some benefits of maintaining the split include:

  • Having an independent barrister reviewing a course of action gives the client a fresh and independent opinion from an expert in the field distinct from solicitors who may maintain ongoing and long-term relationships with the client.[5]
  • In many jurisdictions, judges are appointed from the bar. Since barristers do not have long-term client relationships and are further removed from clients than solicitors, judicial appointees are more independent.
  • Having recourse to all of the specialist barristers at the bar can enable smaller firms, who could not maintain large specialist departments, to compete with larger firms.
  • A barrister acts as a check on the solicitor conducting the trial; if it becomes apparent that the claim or defense has not been properly conducted by the solicitor prior to trial, the barrister can (and usually has a duty to) advise the client of a separate possible claim against the solicitor.
  • Expertise in conducting trials, owing to the fact that barristers are specialist advocates.
  • In many jurisdictions, barristers must follow the cab-rank rule, which obliges them to accept a brief if it is in their area of expertise and if they are available, facilitating access to justice for the unpopular.